Fall and Halloween Pet Safety Tips for Groveport Pet Families

As the weather turns blustery and pumpkins start appearing on front porches, it’s time to think about what you can do to make this time of year as safe and enjoyable as possible for your pet. There’s no need to overdo it and restrict your pet from their usual activities, but there are several things you can do to minimize potential threats in their environment both on Halloween and during the fall season as a whole. And if there’s any extra advice you need, just contact our animal hospital!

Fall Safety Precautions

Weather

Fall often starts out mild, but sooner or later the days will start turning colder. Don’t let the weather take you or your pet by surprise—always make sure your pet is comfortable and protected from the elements.

  • Don’t leave your pet outdoors unattended for too long, especially if it’s cold. Despite their fur coat, pets can also develop hypothermia.
  • Does your pet have a very fine or short coat? They’ll need whatever extra warmth they can get! Invest in a cozy coat or sweater that your pet can wear for their daily walks.
  • If for any reason your pet does need to stay outdoors, provide them with a sturdy shelter that is several inches off the ground and able to keep out the wind and rain. Include clean, dry bedding and fresh water and food, and check on your pet whenever you can.

Poisonous Fungi

A majority of wild mushrooms are harmless, but a few can be deadly if ingested, including the death cap and it’s relative, the Destroying Angel. The death cap is popping up in more places throughout the US, and typically grows around tree roots. For the sake of safety, remove any mushrooms you see growing in your yard and dispose of them immediately.

For more information regarding mushroom toxicity and pets, you can contact us or reach out to the Pet Poison Helpline at (855) 764-7661.

Halloween Safety

Candy and Other Treats

When it comes to pets getting upset stomachs from ingesting candy, chocolate is one of the biggest culprits. However, many sugar-free sweets contain xylitol, a sugar substitute that can cause death if it’s consumed in large enough quantities. Keep that bowl (or bag) of candy stored far out of your pet’s reach, and keep a close eye on your pet! If they got into any candy and aren’t acting like themselves, let us know immediately.

Decor

Candles are always a fire hazard whether you have a pet or not, but the odds of an accident happening are much higher if you have a dog and/or cat in your home. Pick up a few artificial candles instead, to use as decoration and to light up your jack-o’-lantern.

Anything with string or dangly pieces that could entice your pet might be best suited in an area your pet can’t reach, or maybe you can opt for a different decoration route. Cats love dangly shiny things, and it’s easy for dogs to poke their noses where they shouldn’t and upend a decorative display or swallow pieces of decorations that could cause choking.

Stress and Anxiety

Strangers at your doorstep and the incessant ringing of your doorbell might prove stressful for your pet. If your pet is crate trained, consider keeping them in their crate or carrier during the designated trick-or-treating hours. Otherwise, keep your pet in a quiet room with their bed/blankets, a favorite toy, fresh water, and some treats. You can also contact us to discuss safe calming options for your pet.

Staying Indoors

Don’t leave your pet outside on Halloween night. Pranks are common, and sometimes, pets can become targets. This is especially a problem for black cats! Additionally, pets have been known to escape through partially opened doors when trick or treaters come calling. If your pet isn’t microchipped, consider having it done at our animal hospital in Groveport so you’ll have a better chance of being reunited.